Is 'mom' British English

Is 'mom' British English

Post by Tom Perr » Sun, 17 Aug 2003 13:42:48


Mom is not British English, though "Mum" is pronounced
roughly the same in the South of England, nor are the
other words Dave lists. However the British are acquiring
a colonial mentality and tend to copy everything they see,
read and hear about the USA, assuming that since they have
a big army, big arses and big heads they must be the
best. How odd that Dave says "sucks", since that is
typically vulgar US slang.
spell checker was
that 'mom' wasn't picked
spell checker must
selected English
eyelid when I
could conceivably
in list form and
Microsoft
accent that this
recognize the
and helps us all the
 
 
 

Is 'mom' British English

Post by Dave Nev » Sun, 17 Aug 2003 17:33:18

Hi

I think you have completely missed the point of my posting.

The title 'Is 'Mom' British English? was rhetorical because like you, I
don't think it is.

This was the point made by the first person. His/her British Spell checker
was not picking it up and even if we recognise such words, they shouldn't
get through the British checker although they are 'conceivably' used in G.B.
Otherwise what is the difference betweeen the American and British spell
checkers?

Secondly, you say that it is 'odd' that I used the slang American verb
'suck'. Apparently, you didn't understand that this was intentional (that's
why it's an anomaly with my *** ney accent) and therefore just a joke.

Finally, the rest of your message isn't worth answering as we are in a
multi-lingual environment.


071c01c363b0$d83dd270$ XXXX@XXXXX.COM

 
 
 

Is 'mom' British English

Post by Cindy Meis » Mon, 18 Aug 2003 18:02:43

Hi Dave,

One factor here is that, while the words may not be common British useage,
they aren't possible *misspellings* of British terms either, and are
commonly used in other parts of the world. (With the possibly exception of
'mom'. But, then, I'd always capitalize it if I did use it, so I consider
'mom' a misspelling even from the U.S. English standpoint.)

This may be a question of what one considers the purpose of a *spell check*
dictionary (as opposed to a dictionary dictionary)?

No, you can't do this with *.lex files.

Ummm, just a note: I'm not a Microsoft employee, or anything like that :-)

FWIW, I do know that the local dictionaries are (supposedly) compiled and
maintained by the local Microsoft people, and not soley by Redmond.

Cindy Meister
INTER-Solutions, Switzerland
http://www.yqcomputer.com/ (last update Jan 24 2003)
http://www.yqcomputer.com/

This reply is posted in the Newsgroup; please post any follow question or
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Is 'mom' British English

Post by Cindy Meis » Tue, 19 Aug 2003 18:15:32

Hi Dave,

I'd try flavor/flavour, color/colour and theater/theatre.

Cindy Meister
INTER-Solutions, Switzerland
http://www.yqcomputer.com/ (last update Jan 24 2003)
http://www.yqcomputer.com/

This reply is posted in the Newsgroup; please post any follow question or
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Is 'mom' British English

Post by Alan Jacks » Thu, 30 Oct 2003 10:52:18

ut as a British English speaker I am far more likely to
want to use a French word, and French words are marked as
spelling errors. Why is one foreign language (American)
treated differently from another (French)?

Alan


between a spell check dictionary and a dictionary
English, they are not spelled wrong, and it is not
occasionally have a reason to type an American word.
are not flagged as misspellings in American texts,
usage or semantics or context into account. It's not
like to do it, but it's actually a very hard problem
http://www.ashmount.com
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM >
TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl
microsoft.public.word.spelling.grammar:10438
bat an eyelid when I
common British useage,
either, and are
possibly exception of
it, so I consider
standpoint.)
purpose of a *spell check*
viewed in list form and
anything like that :-)
(supposedly) compiled and
by Redmond.
update Jan 24 2003)
follow question or
confers no rights. Use of included script samples
http://www.microsoft.com/info/cpyright.htm
responses to this message are best directed to the
 
 
 

Is 'mom' British English

Post by WAW » Fri, 31 Oct 2003 03:59:17

ust a "sidebar": "mom" as in "His mom..." is not misspelled. In the case
of, say, "Hi, Mom,..." it is. This is, no doubt, beyond the capability of
any spell checker. However, it does seem to me that words like labour and
recognise are flagged by the American English spell checker. Damned
arrogant Yanks again.
Al

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message news:056401c39dbf$493b4000$ XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...


 
 
 

Is 'mom' British English

Post by Doug Potte » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 07:26:43

om (in lower case) is acceptable in either English as in "he went to see
his mom." American is not a foreign language relative to British - it is a
different dialect. Note that most American forms (e.g. "organize") are
considered correct by most British references - a convention we follow.

--
Doug
__
The Legal Guys make me say:
Please do not send e-mail directly to this alias. This alias is for
newsgroup purposes only. This posting is provided "AS IS" with no
warranties, and confers no rights.
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Is 'mom' British English

Post by Alan Jacks » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 20:49:46

either Mom nor mom is acceptable in English. That it is
acceptable in American simply demonstrates that the
languages are different. And no English references accept
forms like 'color', 'analyze', 'diaper' (as a noun)
unless marking them as US - just as 'naif', 'carrefour'
and 'boulangerie' are marked French. The only forms that
are sometimes acceptable are verbs in ise/ize.

Microsoft have had nearly a decade to sort this out, and
nothing seems to have happened. Thank God for Cindy.

Alan

in "he went to see
to British - it is a
(e.g. "organize") are
convention we follow.
alias is for
IS" with no
misspelled. In the case
beyond the capability of
words like labour and
checker. Damned
wue.freespamserve.co.uk> wrote in
likely to
marked as
(American)
American
correctly
take
We'd
Ltd,
didn't
terms
the
did use
be
soley
any
warranties, and
all
 
 
 

Is 'mom' British English

Post by Mike Willi » Sat, 01 Nov 2003 21:20:35


That would be a layman's assessment of 'language' but the truth is far
subtler. Try reading for example, "The Power of Babel" by John
McWhorter.( http://www.yqcomputer.com/ )


Actually references like the OED *prefer* the spelling "analyze" to
"analyse". For a discussion see:
a.. http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ~shughes/a57998/izeise.html
b.. http://www.yqcomputer.com/
c.. http://www.yqcomputer.com/
d.. http://www.yqcomputer.com/
You (or an institution) are of course free to make a "personal" decision as
to what broadly-accepted spellings you prefer. That's one reason why custom
and exclude dictionaries are available in the Word spell-checker.