Linux switchover and windummy anti-Linux botnet attacks were coordinated

Linux switchover and windummy anti-Linux botnet attacks were coordinated

Post by 7 » Sun, 06 Feb 2011 05:43:54


Linux switchover and windummy anti-Linux botnet attacks were coordinated
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http://www.yqcomputer.com/ *** attack-during-linux-switch/


One can but wonder whether micoshaft ordered the botnet attacks
from hackers on London Stock Exchange as a form of revenge for dropping
the .NIT crash prone micoshaft software.

At least we now know what other criminal activities
micoshaft windummies get up to when they get smacked down
and booted out of serious businesses.

So if your sites are attacked ever again because of
a Linux switch and you happen to also boot out micoshaft
from your premises, be sure to let the Linux admins a free handle
on the botnet attackers.

A few videos of Linux admins thwacking the botnet retards live
as it happens finding its way into Youtube will have the world laughing at
the windummy retards for good. And it will help more business to
switch over to Linux faster when they see mince meat being made
of botnet retards.

You only have to look at how the stock exchanges
around the world that already switched over to Linux to know
Linux has better handle on speed and security.
 
 
 

Linux switchover and windummy anti-Linux botnet attacks were coordinated

Post by High Plain » Mon, 07 Feb 2011 17:25:19


Link also states:

[quote]
But the trading system was also thrown offline last November in what the
LSE called uspicious circumstances So far, the official
explanation is human error, but it is understood that the police have been
drawn into investigations.

Unlike US exchanges, the LSE platform is not based on the internet, and
therefore is less vulnerable to general *** attacks. However, ***
attacks on exchanges are becoming more advanced, according to security
experts, and this poses new threats.

The LSE declined to make any comment on the events, ongoing investigations
or possible motives for any attacks.

The new system, based in a C++ environment and running on a Linux
operating system, is already live on the LSE Turquoise, or anonymous,
trading venue.

As the concern and speculation deepens around the LSE outages, the
exchange is due to switch on the new systems on its main exchange in two
weekstime, with dress rehearsals over the coming two weekends. It
replaces a Microsoft .Net architecture. The system has been live since
last summer on the Turquoise venue.
[/quote]

It is serious business when the LEO's get involved. IIRC, there was
concern that because the Microsoft Windows server .net system was being
replaced, someone decided to create foul play toward the Linux based
system. That is a criminal act, no matter the reason.

There was a practical reason for replacing the .net architecture. It just
does not work well in that particular application and was very hardware
intensive (slow). It was an expensive experiment and the LSE saw no
further reason to continue it.

--
HPT