What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:06:08



No shiite head Bubba--the system is not mine, it's loaned to a friend,
far away in fact. Any other "brilliant" ideas, Einstein?

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:10:46


Uh, ok. But maybe that's why you were fired? (using old equipment)
Probably not, but the thought comes to mind.

Do you have a vote on a min hardware distro?

It's surprising how un-helpful Linux advocates are. Their main point--
and indeed only point--is not to waste bandwidth answering trolls.
Back in the days when bandwidth was limited and the Internet was
government owned, that was a good point, but no more; however, Linux
users are stuck in the past, still fighting the battle that was
settled by litigation 10+ years ago, that MSFT charges vendors for
Windows regardless of what OS is actually loaded...that is so, what,
1995?

BTW If you don't believe I am sincere, at least answer the questions
raised for the benefit of people Googling this issue in the future.

RL

 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:15:29


Thanks for the Elive cite. I just checked their website--and it fits
the bill. However, they insist on money for the "fits on one CD
version".

I don't want to pay for something that might not work.

Also, how stable is this? For surfing the web (mainly checking email)
and printing a letter, how often does Elive (or any other 'minimum
hardware' distro) crash?

RL

PS--notice the bad english: "I have not put a minimum donation"...wow,
how good a programmer is this guy? I hope he's foreign, that would be
excuseable and understandable.

RL

Please give me something to continue my work!

Why request a donation ?

Elive is free and made with pleasure for your pleasure, but free does
not mean "no cost" . I spend all my time developing Elive. It is my
choice. Your choice is whether or not downloading Elive is worth a
donation. I have not put a minimum donation, because I realize that
many of you are students with very limited resources. I thank You for
showing interest in Elive, and hope to see you in #elive on IRC!

You decide the value Elive has for you. What do you obtain ? You
maintain the future of Elive and you also receive faster downloads.

No Money: If you can't possible to donate for Download Elive, we
propose you those solutions:

* The better option is to use our invitation codes system
* You can try Elive from a development version.
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:25:02

FINALLY! Somebody who sounds like they know what they're talking
about! Thanks Douglas Mayne. My comments inline below.




OK, I believe you.



Got that. I did upgrade memory to at least 256 (I think in fact it's
512) and my CPU is faster than above.


YES! This is indeed the bottleneck. You are spot on.


YES! Again, spot on. I did buy on eBay a SATA PCI disk controller,
but, as bad luck would have it, the form factor was such that it would
not fit on my PCI slot. So I will have to rebuy it if I go down that
route again. But, though I have build many a system from scratch, I
rather not reorder a disk controller, wait a week, then disassemble
the case, play with the cards (it's very crowded on this small factor
mobo), etc etc. If--remember this fix is for a clueless noob who
literally checks email on Yahoo and prints a short letter once in a
blue moon--nothing fancy, and not even Java is required on the web
browser--if I can get away with just a software upgrade I would be
very happy, since that's less time wasted for me.

So, I ask again, which distro? Thanks in advance...

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by Andrew Hal » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:28:34


Can't come up with your own ideas?
Note to readers. That's almost word for word what I put at the bottom of my
first reply to this waster.
"NB: this is not for the benefit of lopez, but for anyone googling in the
future"

If there's anything lopez lacks, it's sincerity.
All he cares about is fud, and he's been chucking a lot of that about in
this thread so far, hasn't he?
--
| XXXX@XXXXX.COM | Windows95 (noun): 32 bit extensions and a |
| | graphical shell for a 16 bit patch to an 8 bit |
| Andrew Halliwell BSc | operating system originally coded for a 4 bit |
| in |microprocessor, written by a 2 bit company, that|
| Computer Science | can't stand 1 bit of competition. |
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:28:42

On Jun 28, 10:55m, General Schvantzkopf < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >



General--I appreciate your answer. It seems you are correct, but for
fun I want to try loading Linux on this machine. Remember the specs,
like a good engineer: the noob does not care about anything but
checking email on Yahoo, printing a letter using OpenOffice--that's
IT! Nothing else. Not even Java on the browser. No games. No email
program like Eudora/Outlook. Nothing.

Windows 2000 'works' (takes forever, but remember AV sw is loaded on
it)--so why can't Linux?

Bonus questions: is Linux stable? How often does it crash? Do
viruses exist (realistically, not 'one time 10 years ago')? Do I need
antivirus software for this simple system?

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:29:23


Damn, you're good. What are you doing in the Linux camp?

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 18:32:16

On Jun 29, 12:51m, Nigel Feltham < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Let's face it--you're not answering the question because:

(1) you don't know;

(2) you are a *** kook who sees conspiracies behind every
tree;

(3) even if you know, it's more to your evil vindictive spirit to
posit a vindictive motive to the OP.

Welcome to the much vaunted Linux "community". With friends like
these, who needs enemies?

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 19:01:16


Android--you're STILL going to hell--stzzzzzz--that's the smell and
sound of human flesh burning. Not too late though...Jesus loves you.

But do you have any constructive comments about Linux for my
question? As I type this, based on other replies, I am downloading
Vector Linux-but since the download speed is apparently deliberately
crippled (to get more money out of users), a simple 600 MB download is
going to take 3 hours +.

Tell me seriously, hell-fire and brimstone boy, do you actually use
Linux? Does it ever crash on you? How often? Windows NT and 2000
are super stable--I've rarely gotten the BSOD except when first
configuring stuff on it. Once stable, it's stable. Is Linux the
same? Let's hear how "honest" you are, hell boy.

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by Andrew Hal » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 19:11:28


I gave my ha'penny's worth days ago, which you of course chose to ignore.
(along with everynoe else who gave you advice)
--
| XXXX@XXXXX.COM | Windows95 (noun): 32 bit extensions and a |
| | graphical shell for a 16 bit patch to an 8 bit |
| Andrew Halliwell BSc | operating system originally coded for a 4 bit |
| in |microprocessor, written by a 2 bit company, that|
| Computer Science | can't stand 1 bit of competition. |
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by Robert Hel » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 20:43:12


I wasn't 'fired' -- I was laid off due to lack of funding.


I already answered that: I have used CentOS (4) on some fairly old
hardware.


--
Robert Heller -- Get the Deepwoods Software FireFox Toolbar!
Deepwoods Software -- Linux Installation and Administration
http://www.yqcomputer.com/ , with CGI and Database
XXXX@XXXXX.COM -- Contract Programming: C/C++, Tcl/Tk
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by General Sc » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 21:51:37


If all you want to do is try Linux on it then download a copy of Fedora 9
Live and try it, all it will cost you is a blank CD. If the system has
512M then it can run the full Gnome desktop, it will just be slow. If F9
won't run on this box then nothing will, in which case you should just
take that system outside and put it out of it's misery.

You never need antivirus software on Linux but with a 200MHz processor
there is no way this system is going to be fast with any modern software.
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by raylopez9 » Mon, 30 Jun 2008 23:59:43


I downloaded Vector--and found out after 3 hours of download that it
needs a 2.3 GB HD, which might be bigger than the 2 GB I have now
(I'll have to check).

Final question to all: what exactly am I getting with Linux, assuming
i can install it, that I don't already have in Windows 2000 on this
old machine? Everybody agrees the hardware will be slow. So, the
only thing I can figure is that with Linux I don't need the bloatware
antivirus program I'm using now (and one reason I want to switch from
Win2000, since this antivirus program slows down this old machine too
much).

Am I correct?

Thanks in advance.

Also as a bonus how often Linux will crash--which will be upsetting
with this noob--would be helpful.

RL
 
 
 

What Linux distro to use for old Intel machine, that fits on CDs?

Post by General Sc » Tue, 01 Jul 2008 00:39:46

n Sun, 29 Jun 2008 07:59:43 -0700, raylopez99 wrote:


If you are asking if moving from Win2K to Linux is going to change your
life, it won't. As you've already figured out, the big advantage to you is
that Linux is malware free. Linux comes with a huge amount of free
software right out of the box, however on the system that you are planning
to use it on this isn't going to help you. Open Office (which you could
run on your Win2K box also) is a little nicer than MSOffice, however it's
actually significantly slower than MSOffice. On modern hardware the
difference isn't noticeable but on a 200MHz box it will probably be pretty
painful. There are lightweight applications like Gnumeric and Abiword that
will be much faster but they aren't nearly as full featured. Evolution is
a terrific e-mail client, it's as least as good as anything on Windows,
and like all Linux apps you won't have to worry about viruses. However if
you are using Outlook now you won't see a lot of differences between
Evolution and Outlook. Linux also comes with a lot of server applications,
however you probably aren't interested in those.

The Gnome Desktop in it's current incarnation is a lot nicer than anything
on Windows, it's certainly light years ahead of Win2K. It's uncluttered as
compared to Windows and lot's more things happen automatically. However
Desktops don't really matter, they have no effect on your productivity.
The one big advantage of Linux desktops is that you can have lots of them,
once you've used multiple desktops you won't understand how you could have
lived without them.

Linux also networks with other machines a lot more naturally. SSH is
installed by default on Linux systems so you can run things on other boxes
just as easily as you can on your local box. On Windows you could install
Cygwin which would allow you to access Linux boxes in the same way but
there is no Windows to Windows equivalent. Rdesktop in XP allows you to
take over another XP box but it only allows one user at a time and it
brings up a whole desktop instead of just the application that you want to
run. BTW Linux has an Rdesktop client so you can access XP boxes this way
if you need to use it.

Win2K was very lightweight as compared to any modern OS including Linux.
While Linux can be stripped down so that it will run on very weak
machines, the process of doing that gives up most of the refinements that
have been added to Linux in recent years.

The bottom line is that you should try a modern full featured distro like
Fedora 9 or Ubuntu 8.0.4 (both of which have live CDs) to see what Linux
looks like. If you are impressed then you should put it on some modern
hardware. I've tried the Via based box and it's fairly decent. However a
quick check on Pricewatch showed that there are actually a fair number of
Athlon 64 X2 boxes that are available for the same money, just search
under PC -NO OS. If you get a new box make sure that you get 2G of RAM,
it's cheap and it will make a huge difference. Any modern CPU will be more
than fast enough so you could cut corners there.