The problem with product activation...

The problem with product activation...

Post by mike » Mon, 30 Apr 2007 15:56:05


... is that it ALWAYS gets cracked (Vista's just got cracked a little
bit ago, for example), so it really doesn't stop piracy much (the
cracks are readily available on the net), and all it therefore does is
serve to frustrate legitimate users who are upgrading/modifying their
machines (it's their machine so they have a right to change and modify
it, you know!) for perfectly legal and reasonable purposes (there's
_nothing_ wrong with upgrading your CPU and motherboard to the latest
models, you know.).

I say that product activation should be dropped. It doesn't help, it
hurts. The real way to curb piracy is to sell the stuff for less, and
have more fair licensing terms, not to hurt the customers with
contrivances like product activation. And this does not just apply to
Microsoft, it applies to any software company that uses similar
things. I wouldn't use them in any software I make, that's for sure. I
know it would be a worthless waste and it would just hurt the end user.
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by none » Tue, 08 May 2007 07:47:09

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



get a mac, and be free...

 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Mike » Mon, 14 May 2007 05:52:51

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



...of $130 every year for the OS subscription. Not to mention the
overpriced hardware to start with.

Mike
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Tim Murra » Tue, 15 May 2007 06:40:01


Sigh, here we go again, from February. Note, the calcs consider Leopard
coming out in May, but now that it's been delayed, Mac is even cheaper:
Wintrolls belabor the point that Mac users who have chosen to upgrade through
all versions have paid more than Windows users. Never mind that fact that Mac
OS has seen features go up -- features Windows doesn't even have -- and speed
increases as well.

I whipped up a little comparison of plain retail prices. I picked Vista
Ultimate because it was the version that has Flip 3D, backup, photo, DVD,
movie, and other features that you get with Tiger + iLife. (see
http://www.yqcomputer.com/ )

Using a date of 01 May for a release of Leopard, if you bought all five Mac
OS X from 10.0 to 10.4 and then Leopard, add in three iLifes, you would pay
$1020 over 2197 days, or 46.43 cents per day. (If it comes out sooner the
cost per day increases.)

If you bought Windows XP Pro for $300 and Windows Visa Ultimate upgrade for
$260, add in three Outlooks (because Express doesn't give you what you get in
Tiger) you would pay $860 over 1830 days, or 46.99 cents per day. And that
doesn't include the aspirin for headaches.
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Jim Lee Jr » Fri, 18 May 2007 13:23:14

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




Can you say "Free from Windoze malware?"

--
Posted from my 1999 Apple G4 Sawtooth
A 450 MHz G4 running OS X 10.4.8
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Derek Curr » Sat, 26 May 2007 02:43:16

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,




Mike loves to lie. I have run rings around him many times on this
subject and he stubbornly continues to lie. This is because Mike
is a troll. He doesn't have facts on his side, so instead he
scares you into doing his will, which is to buy inferior computer
technology. His motives? You figure it out. To me he is just
another run-of-the-mill sado *** . Thus his adherence to the
Windows world.

Every single professional study every performed comparing the
total cost (not merely purchase cost) of comparably outfitted
Windows PCs versus Macs has proven that Macs are CHEAPER. They
save you money. They always have. Stories to the contrary have
always been myths invented by those who don't want you to live in
reality. I have data galore to back up my statement. Just ask me
to dump it here and I will.

There are reasons to buy or build Windows PCs. Saving money isn't
one of them.

Share and enjoy,

:-Derek

--
Fortune Magazine 11-29-05: What's your computer setup today?
Frederick Brooks: I happily use a Macintosh. It's not been
equalled for ease of use, and I want my computer to be a tool,
not a challenge.
< http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ;
[Frederick Brooks is the author of 'The Mythical Man Month'.
He spearheaded the movement to modernize computer software
engineering in 1975.]
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Edwi » Wed, 06 Jun 2007 23:47:09


"The Macs require a greater density of field associates. Where we have
1-to-150 PC techs to users, we're somewhere down to 1-to-100 for Macs.
I think that's due partly to the technology and partly due to the
users. The creatives are more demanding and you have to be more
responding, because those are the people that clearly create our
revenue," says Anschuetz."

"Companies switching to Macs entirely should carefully evaluate
software application parity. "You may find that [down the line] some
of the things you want to buy for your business-an ERP [application],
for example-don't have as satisfactory or robust a client
implementation on the Mac as it does on the PC," Anschuetz says. "

http://www.yqcomputer.com/


"How come Macintosh users don't post HATE in the Microsoft advocacy
newsgroup? How come we keep our gripes about Microsoft within our own
group? " -- Derek Currie

http://www.yqcomputer.com/

You've been exposed as the liar, Derek. Again. For the ump *** th
time.
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Mike » Sat, 09 Jun 2007 20:56:33


Derek loves to lie. I have run rings around him many times on this
subject and he stubbornly continues to lie. This is because Derek
is a troll. He doesn't have facts on his side, so instead he
scares you into doing his will, which is to buy inferior computer
technology. His motives? You figure it out. To me he is just
another run-of-the-mill sado *** . Thus his adherence to the
Macintosh world.

Mike
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by Alex Low » Sun, 17 Jun 2007 23:07:29

The problem with that logic is the the Mac is even more locked down than
Windows (see: TPM). If one wants to be Free in the software world, join RMS
( http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ).

Seriously, though, to mike3: You're right. It's too bad Microsoft has (for
all intensive purposes) a Monopoly on desktop Operating Systems (a
commodity product).

To Derek: Get a life.
 
 
 

The problem with product activation...

Post by mega » Tue, 24 Jul 2007 05:32:59


You are right. Product activation sucks. Besides, history has shown us
that people (and pets) respond better to carrots than sticks.

If they really want to control the desktop (which, IMHO, is simply the
wrong approach) they should put it online. Then you would simply pay
monthly or yearly to use an activeX control in IE (on a basic, free
version of Windows) to log in to your online desktop. (Think Remote
Desktop or GoToMyPC or LogMeIn - but with a hosted PC.)

Then, they could control desktop access and licensing completely.

The only drawback would be if the user's internet connection went down.

meg