New laptop - resize win partition?

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Torfinn In » Wed, 07 May 2008 08:55:27


OK, so I got a new laptop[1] for work. Because it is for work I'll need
to keep windows (xp) on it.
Fine, no problem, I'll just resize the windows partition, shrinking it
to make room for FreeBSD. Then I'll run a dual boot system.

Only one small snag - the disk is encrypted (with SafeGuard Easy v4.10),
which means that I'll have to boot from it to access it.
I have already tried a couple of tools (windows based) in order to
resize the windows partition. Unfortunately, they fail when they come to
the execution stage (ie. reboot, then run batch process in "shell mode").

fdisk output:
tingo@testhost-1$ fdisk ad4
******* Working on device /dev/ad4 *******
parameters extracted from in-core disklabel are:
cylinders=193821 heads=16 sectors/track=63 (1008 blks/cyl)

Figures below won't work with BIOS for partitions not in cyl 1
parameters to be used for BIOS calculations are:
cylinders=193821 heads=16 sectors/track=63 (1008 blks/cyl)

Media sector size is 512
Warning: BIOS sector numbering starts with sector 1
Information from DOS bootblock is:
The data for partition 1 is:
sysid 7 (0x07),(OS/2 HPFS, NTFS, QNX-2 (16 bit) or Advanced UNIX)
start 63, size 195365457 (95393 Meg), flag 80 (active)
beg: cyl 0/ head 1/ sector 1;
end: cyl 1023/ head 239/ sector 63
The data for partition 2 is:
<UNUSED>
The data for partition 3 is:
<UNUSED>
The data for partition 4 is:
<UNUSED>

Any hints on how I can resize this partition without destroying anything
on it?

Reinstalling is not an option - the laptop installation is centrally
managed and standardized, which just brings me back to square one again.

Currently, I have tested FreeBSD by booting off an usb disk.

References:
1) http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--
Torfinn Ingolfsen,
Norway
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by jpd » Wed, 07 May 2008 20:20:51

Begin < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Backup and restore would seem to be called for, unless you can find a
windows-based partition mover that'll work together with the encryption
program.



Wipe the disk, add the FreeBSD partition, ask the people who manage the
standard image to install around that. You'll probably need to talk
to them anyway, so could just as well do that first. If you're lucky
they're clueful and the regs would allow it or at least not disallow it.
If not, well, you're at square one already anyway.


--
j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Rainer Duf » Thu, 08 May 2008 00:03:32

Torfinn Ingolfsen schrieb:

If the whole disk is encrypted and booting from it gets you into a
bare-bones "enter password here" window, then you can forget about
running FreeBSD.
The whole disk is basically a brick and Windows needs a driver so it can
actually read the data (at least, this was the case with ControlBreak's
SafeBoot, last time I used it - I assume above program is similar)

Unfortunately, these kinds of measures are really the only way to make
sure no data gets lifted off a stolen laptop (and it doesn't get
tampered with via a software-keylogger)


Rainer
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Lowell Gil » Thu, 08 May 2008 00:28:05

jpd < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > writes:



Disk encryption *should* be designed to force booting from the
encrypted disk once the the decryption key is available. If that's
the case, the only way a resizer could work is to be able to work on
the same disk the system booted from. While theoretically possible,
it's unlikely anybody's bothered to build something like that. You
can hope I'm wrong...


In which case, ignoring the hard disk and booting from an external
drive is probably the path of least resistance.
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Torfinn In » Thu, 08 May 2008 05:41:43


I agree.


You are (or at least have been in the past) wrong. Programs (for
Windows) that will resize the disk they run from exist.
Acronis Disk Director[2] and PowerQuest Partition Magic[1] are two
examples that claim to work that way.
Good old PartitionMagic 8.0 worked wonders on an older version of
SafeGuard Easy in the past. Why it doesn't work now, I don't know. I
have never tried Disk Director before, so I can't tell if it used to
work or not.


I'm still hoping to avoid having to drag an external drive with me just
to be able to dual boot a laptop.

References:
1) Powerquest PartitionMagic http://www.yqcomputer.com/
2) Acronis Disk Director
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--
Torfinn Ingolfsen,
Norway
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Matthew X. » Thu, 08 May 2008 05:41:45

>>>>> "Torfinn" == Torfinn Ingolfsen < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > writes:

Torfinn> Only one small snag - the disk is encrypted (with
Torfinn> SafeGuard Easy v4.10), which means that I'll have to boot
Torfinn> from it to access it.

According to their web site, SGE supports multi-booting and partially
encrypted disks, so hopefully there are no technical limitations to
having both the encrypted Windows volume and an unencrypted FreeBSD
volume. If you are lucky enough to have clueful infosec staff, you
should try to convince them to work with you on re-configuring your
laptop.

When you have some free time and the facilities to make several
backups of your laptop, you could try the following procedure:

1. Create a bitwise copy of your laptop's hard drive. You should be
able to restore this and still have the original encrypted boot
loader and friends work. If it doesn't, you can always say your
laptop got fragged by the Worldwide Deadly Secret Gangster
Communist Computer God or something.

2. If you can log into the laptop with a relatively unencumbered
administrator account, you should be able to back up the operating
system to an external hard disk or to a network share using Windows
Backup (including the system state).

3. From there, wipe the laptop's hard drive and repartition,
re-install Windows, and patch it back up to the same service pack
level as the original Windows install. Once you have a basic
Windows install up, you should be able to restore your backup and
boot back into Windows.

4. It's possible that you'll have to fiddle around with the storage
driver bindings as well. You might have to boot from something
like BartPE in order to hack through the system registry
post-restore. Good luck with that.

5. Install FreeBSD, etc.

I don't know how well this would work. The hardest part might prove
to be getting Windows to boot after you restore the backup. That's
where I keep getting stuck, anyway. I gave up after I was able to
talk the client CISO into letting me install the disk encryption
software to my specifications.

Best wishes,
Matthew

--
I slashread your textcast about jargon and nodnodnod with your *** -sentiment.
- gad_zuki! ( http://www.yqcomputer.com/ )
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Torfinn In » Thu, 08 May 2008 05:50:57


Perhaps it is only the (windows) partitions that are encrypted.
My previous work laptop ran a dual boot with FreeBSD fine. It also had
SafeGuard Easy on the disk. Perhaps that was an earlier version. The
machine died, so I can't check what was on the disk now.


Some info about SafeGuard Easy is in this article[1] on Wikipedia.

References:
1) http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--
Torfinn Ingolfsen,
Norway
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by Chuck McCr » Fri, 09 May 2008 09:58:57


Bollucks - whole disk encryption crap: see

http://www.yqcomputer.com/

Sleep tight.
 
 
 

New laptop - resize win partition?

Post by SafeBoot S » Sat, 17 May 2008 09:28:57

>

Are you confused? The princeton attack is only valid for 7 seconds on
a machine which is off, and has pre-boot authentication.

If the machine is on and logged in through the pre-boot encryption,
you should be quoting firewire attack vectors - princeton doesnt
apply.

properly implemented whole disk encryption is completely secure once
the machine has been off for 7 seconds.

S.