Solution to BCB's future problem.

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Jeff Dougl » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 07:03:21


I think I have come up with a sure fire way to solve everyone's problem
regarding BuilderX's long term support of VCL issues, and all general SW
application development issues for that matter.

Learn to hang drywall or lay tile. At least after you have spent a couple of
months, or years for that matter, learning how to use the tools to do the
job rite and make a good living, you can probably bet that these tools will
remain basically unchanged and you are set for life. Then you can start
enjoying you nights and weekends doing whatever turns you on and not worry
about having to update all your skills due to all your tools becoming
obsolete. On top of that, you will most likely make much more money, since
the future of SW development jobs is bleak at best unless you live in India
or Russia, and your life will be considerably less stressful.

Just my thoughts and an attempt to amuse the masses.

Jeff
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Michael Mc » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 07:31:23


I doubt many find it amusing. Things change in the computer business,
sure. What most expect is that vendors give them road maps and make
some promise of support so that plans can be made for the long-term.
Let's face it -- software is a money pit and being shafted by your
tools supplier is less than desirable.

What Borland has done is completely inexcusable. They remain
tight-lipped about future plans and then yank the proverbial rug out
from under regarding the VCL. How can anyone make a reasonable plan
given this type of behavior from your tools vendor? It makes >>you<<
look like an idiot to the boss man.

At least a respectable company like Turbopower dumped their tools as
open source on SourceForge so at least those with an investment in
them could continue to fix bugs and/or extend (or even port them) if
desired. Borland should do the same with BCB -- the entire IDE, VCL
and CLX source should be made open source. As long as the compiler
continues to work on VCL code they can keep that proprietary.

Short of that: forget Borland. I've had enough.

Michael

 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Jeff Dougl » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 07:45:57

Please don't get me wrong. I was not making light of the situation. I feel
exactly as you do. My post was an attempt at stating a serious thought/idea
with a bit of sarcasm added just to take the edge off it.

Jeff
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Ed Mulroy » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 08:08:59

> ...Learn to hang drywall or lay tile...

There is some truth to that.

At one time my manager was the manager for Electronic Design Engineering.
He was the only one in his family to graduate even from High School. All
his brothers were plumbers, bricklayers, and people who did drywall and the
like.

He got a bachelor's degree in EE from Clemson, had gone to work for Hughes
and his abilities were so well thought of that they made him a Hughes
Fellow, giving him a fellowship which he used at UCLA to get his masters in
EE. People would call him from all over the country with tough design
problems and most of the time he would tell them a solution immediately
after hearing the problem described on the phone.

So here is this technical genius now bringing in a paycheck commensurate
with being a manager and technical leader of 12 engineers and a team of
technicians. His wife is a VP at a local bank, running one of their branch
offices.

He made less than any of his brothers - they used to send him their old
lamps and things like that because compared to them he was poor!

Of course the deal is that each of his brothers had opened a business doing
that and had others out on the street so that when one of those employees
earned a buck, the brother earned a bit too.

. Ed
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by pNichol » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 17:17:54


I have been seriously comtemplating changing careers after 15 years in the
IT software business. I am getting too old to learn something brand new
every six months.

I have been doing Delphi, BCB, and Java for the past 7,3,and 5 years in
order of tool listings. Java changes every six months, and frameworks are
changing faster than anyone can possibly keep up. In the current job market
doesn't matter what you know, it is never what the client(s) are looking
for.

Know Oracle? they want DB/2. Know DB/2, they want Oracle. Know Oracle and
DB/2, they want MS-SQL Server. Know Java and BEA, they want Web Sphere
experience. Know Web Sphere and BEA, they want Oracle 9I App Server. Know
all of these, they want JBoss.

Its a no win situation, getting worst.

Almost anyone with a broad range of experience, can adapt to whatever given
minimal time. But employers and contracts now want instantaneous experience
in everything (which, of course, is impossible).
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Andrew Ryb » Sun, 02 Nov 2003 19:49:23

> Almost anyone with a broad range of experience, can adapt to whatever given

Indeed. It's very funny to read some job requirements.
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Fishfac » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 01:09:45


Yes, and then there are the odd two or three letter abbreviation
of which I have never heard. I have heard of one case where
the Human Resources people tried to match everything on the list,
disqualifying many good people, and interviewed ony a few,
unsuitable candidates...
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Ed Mulroy » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 02:39:14

When C++ Builder was newly released, about 1 month old, I saw an employment
ad asking for people with 5 years experience with Builder. Never, ever
underestimate the brains of a Human Resources department.

. Ed
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by David Erba » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 02:44:07


I'm in the same boat. It's gotten so bad lately that I applied for a
position that seemed as though they had read my resume and tailored the
ad for my background, and it was for a pretty specific job in a 'niche'
market. I've always been in the top end of my field, and this is the
first time I've ever had any difficulty locating work.

I was told I didn't even make the review cut.

David Erbas-White
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Dennis Lan » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 02:55:06


of
will
India

Good luck on your new Vocation!
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Dennis Lan » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 02:57:04


I sympathize and agree with you 100%.
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Alan Belli » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 04:13:18


Why tell us not to do the impossible <g>?

Alan Bellingham
--
Team Thai Kingdom
<url: http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ; Borland newsgroup descriptions
<url: http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ; netiquette
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Shane Stum » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 04:49:01

I agree.

I am waiting to read in the paper that the US has declared war on a country
in the Middle East and then had to surrender because the DOD didn't realize
it had outsourced its' computer operations/hosting to the country we
attacked.

Regards,

Shane




couple
tools
not
you
market
given
experience
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Andrew Ryb » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 04:55:18

> When C++ Builder was newly released, about 1 month old, I saw an employment

LOL, but yes it's *** y trooth, - I saw similar requirements about Delphi.
 
 
 

Solution to BCB's future problem.

Post by Randall Pa » Mon, 03 Nov 2003 05:57:04

Sorry, In 10 or 20 years drywall is going to be obsolesced by nanotech
materials.

Accountancy work is getting shipped to India along with programming
jobs. There are even radiologists in India looking at American X Rays,
CAT scans, and MRI scans. Of course, eventually computers will do the
work of radiologists.

Even dogs are going to be replaced by semiconductor sensors for sniffing
*** .

There is no job security.