WEBDAV & XP Getting UNC Path not Http:\\path, Please Help

WEBDAV & XP Getting UNC Path not Http:\\path, Please Help

Post by SnJldm » Thu, 18 Dec 2003 07:01:22


Upgraded to IIS6, everyhting works except WEBDAV publishing on XP. When I open a WEBDAV folder to http:\\webaddress\directory I get back \\webaddress\directory (UNC Path), this should not happen. Although I have another site on https:\\securesiteaddress\directory\subdirectory and it works, the only thing thats different is the "subdirectory" but it works both ways on Windows 2000 Pro.

Below is an article I found that tries to explain some of this but I still don't understand. Maybe somebody came accross this problem and give us some light on the subject.

**************
WebDAV Redirector
WebDAV is one of the features of Windows 2000 that is still largely unknown even by experienced administrators. Even among those who have some notion what it about, it remains underappreciated for its benefits and for the security issues it presents.

Windows 2000 is WebDAV enabled as a client if you publish to a Web Folder from the Desktop, Office Application, or Internet Explorer. You can however, use NotePad or Wordpad as those programs are not WebDAV enabled. In other words, the client software bears the responsibility of being WebDAV enabled.

Not so in XP. Everything in the OS can publish to a WebDAV enabled Web server such as IIS 5.0, IIS 5.1 or IIS 6. This is because XP contains a WebDAV network redirector thereby enabling non-WebDAV client software to open and save files to the Web server over HTTP.

This is a big deal.

You can now map a drive to a Web server so that when you save a file to drive X:, for example, it is published directly to a Web server. You can also select ile, openand type http://servername/folder as a pathname just as you can a drive letter or UNC pathname.

However, there is some confusion in XP land. WebDAV is touted as being the preferred method for publishing content to a Web server, but when you use the WebDAV, network redirector cannot create a Web folder or map a path to ervernameonly. In other words, http://servername will fail to successfully map. You will get a window, but it is computer icon next to \\localhost indicating the redirector returned to you a UNC pathname even though you clearly specified a URL. Your request for a web folder was completely ignored and you are given a connection to a folder using a different protocol than the one you requested. This seems like a bug to me.

If you specify a URL that ends with a folder name in the form http://servername/directory, then your web folder request is handled correctly.

What this means is that you cannot access the content in the root of a Web server using the XP WebDAV redirector. So, you can edit default.asp, global.asa or any other content that resides in the webroot using the new redirector.
 
 
 

WEBDAV & XP Getting UNC Path not Http:\\path, Please Help

Post by David Wang » Fri, 19 Dec 2003 05:36:21

Did you enable WebDAV on IIS6?

--
//David
IIS
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
//


Upgraded to IIS6, everyhting works except WEBDAV publishing on XP. When I
open a WEBDAV folder to http:\\webaddress\directory I get back
\\webaddress\directory (UNC Path), this should not happen. Although I have
another site on https:\\securesiteaddress\directory\subdirectory and it
works, the only thing thats different is the "subdirectory" but it works
both ways on Windows 2000 Pro.

Below is an article I found that tries to explain some of this but I still
don't understand. Maybe somebody came accross this problem and give us some
light on the subject.

**************
WebDAV Redirector
WebDAV is one of the features of Windows 2000 that is still largely unknown
even by experienced administrators. Even among those who have some notion
what it's about, it remains underappreciated for its benefits and for the
security issues it presents.

Windows 2000 is WebDAV enabled as a client if you publish to a Web Folder
from the Desktop, Office Application, or Internet Explorer. You can't
however, use NotePad or Wordpad as those programs are not WebDAV enabled. In
other words, the client software bears the responsibility of being WebDAV
enabled.

Not so in XP. Everything in the OS can publish to a WebDAV enabled Web
server such as IIS 5.0, IIS 5.1 or IIS 6. This is because XP contains a
WebDAV network redirector thereby enabling non-WebDAV client software to
open and save files to the Web server over HTTP.

This is a big deal.

You can now map a drive to a Web server so that when you save a file to
drive X:, for example, it is published directly to a Web server. You can
also select "file, open" and type http://servername/folder as a pathname
just as you can a drive letter or UNC pathname.

However, there is some confusion in XP land. WebDAV is touted as being the
preferred method for publishing content to a Web server, but when you use
the WebDAV, network redirector cannot create a Web folder or map a path to
"servername" only. In other words, http://servername will fail to
successfully map. You will get a window, but it is computer icon next to
\\localhost indicating the redirector returned to you a UNC pathname even
though you clearly specified a URL. Your request for a web folder was
completely ignored and you are given a connection to a folder using a
different protocol than the one you requested. This seems like a bug to me.

If you specify a URL that ends with a folder name in the form
http://servername/directory, then your web folder request is handled
correctly.

What this means is that you cannot access the content in the root of a Web
server using the XP WebDAV redirector. So, you can't edit default.asp,
global.asa or any other content that resides in the webroot using the new
redirector.