Icon Programming Language FAQ

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Tue, 08 Jul 2003 23:48:33


rchive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated April 16, 2003

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sun, 03 Aug 2003 00:54:32

rchive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated April 16, 2003

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)

 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Thu, 04 Sep 2003 23:31:09

rchive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated April 16, 2003

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Fri, 05 Dec 2003 04:48:49

rchive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated November 19, 2003

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sat, 28 Feb 2004 04:49:36

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated February 17, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Values have types; variables are typeless
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Wed, 03 Mar 2004 08:23:52

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated February 17, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Values have types; variables are typeless
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sat, 03 Apr 2004 09:00:06

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Values have types; variables are typeless, a
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sun, 04 Apr 2004 01:35:06

rchive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sun, 02 May 2004 16:00:07

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Values have types; variables are typeless, a
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Wed, 02 Jun 2004 16:00:05

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Values have types; variables are typeless, a
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Fri, 02 Jul 2004 16:00:04

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. Where are some simple examples?
A7. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Valu
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Mon, 02 Aug 2004 16:00:05

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. Where are some simple examples?
A7. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Valu
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Thu, 02 Sep 2004 16:00:07

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated March 24, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. Where are some simple examples?
A7. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually interpreted

* Evolved from programming languages (vs. scripting languages)
* Procedural control flow plus generators and goal-directed
evaluation

* Valu
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Sat, 02 Oct 2004 16:00:07

osted-by: postfaq 1.12 (Perl 5.5.30)
Archive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated September 30, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. Where are some simple examples?
A7. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually i
 
 
 

Icon Programming Language FAQ

Post by icon-proje » Tue, 02 Nov 2004 16:00:05

osted-by: postfaq 1.12 (Perl 5.5.30)
Archive-name: comp-lang-icon-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly


Frequently Asked Questions about the Icon programming language

www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/faq.htm
Last updated September 30, 2004

Learning about Icon
A1. What is Icon?
A2. What is Icon good for?
A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?
A4. What is the Icon program library?
A5. Where can I learn more about Icon?
A6. Where are some simple examples?
A7. How about comprehensive documentation?

Implementations
B1. What platforms support Icon?
B2. How do I get started with Icon?
B3. Is there a Unicode version of Icon?
B4. What happened to the compiler?

Administration
C1. What is the Icon Project?
C2. How often is the on-line material updated?
C3. Where did Icon come from?
C4. Where is Icon going?

Support
D1. Is there a users' group for Icon?
D2. How do I get technical support?

Programming
E1. Why doesn't read() work with every?
E2. Why doesn't string invocation such as "foo"() work?
E3. How can I call a C function?
E4. Can I open a bidirectional pipe?
_________________________________________________________________

Learning about Icon

A1. What is Icon?

Icon is a very high level general-purpose programming language with
extensive features for processing strings (text) and data structures.
Icon is an imperative, procedural language with a syntax that is
reminiscent of C and Pascal, but with semantics at a much higher
level.

Icon has a novel expression-evaluation mechanism that integrates
goal-directed evaluation and backtracking with conventional control
structures. It has a string scanning facility for pattern matching
that avoids the tedious details usually associated with analyzing
strings. Icon's built-in data structures include sets and tables with
associative lookup, lists that can be used as vectors or stacks and
queues, and records.

Icon is a strongly, though not statically, typed language. It provides
transparent automatic type conversion: For example, if an integer is
used in an operation that requires a string, the integer is
automatically converted to a string.

Several implementations of Icon have high-level graphics facilities
with an easily programmed window interface.

Icon manages storage automatically. Objects are created as needed
during program execution and space is reclaimed by garbage collection
as needed. The sizes of strings and data structures are limited only
by the amount of available memory.

A2. What is Icon good for?

As a general-purpose programming language with a large computational
repertoire, Icon can be used for most programming tasks. It's
especially strong at building software tools, for processing text, and
for experimental and research applications.

Icon is designed to make programming easy; it emphasizes the value of
programmer's time and the importance of getting programs to work
quickly. Consequently, Icon is used both for short, one-shot tasks and
for very complex applications.

A3. What are Icon's distinguishing characteristics?

* A high-level, general-purpose programming language
* Friendly line-oriented syntax (no semicolons needed)
* Emphasis on programmer productivity
* Usually i