Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:49:12


rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Sat, 17 Jan 2004 18:20:20

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Tue, 17 Feb 2004 19:03:12

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Sun, 18 Apr 2004 20:28:22

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Wed, 30 Jun 2004 03:44:09

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Fri, 30 Jul 2004 13:18:16

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Mon, 30 Aug 2004 13:29:41

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Thu, 30 Sep 2004 13:19:29

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Sat, 30 Oct 2004 13:25:33

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Mon, 29 Nov 2004 14:17:31

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Thu, 30 Dec 2004 14:28:13

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 14:46:31

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Tue, 01 Mar 2005 14:28:40

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Thu, 31 Mar 2005 14:35:36

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip
 
 
 

Patent Research FAQ v.2.2

Post by davi » Sun, 01 May 2005 13:25:39

rchive-name: internet/patent-research-faq
Posting-Frequency: monthly
Last-modified: Mar 02 2000
URL: http://spireproject.com
Copyright: (c) 2000 David Novak
Maintainer: David Novak < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >


Patent Research FAQ

Welcome. This FAQ introduces the tools and concepts used in patent
research. We are covering the process of locating comparable patents -
not the legal process of patent protection.

This FAQ resides at SpireProject.com/patfaq.txt
SpireProject.co.uk/patfaq.txt and http://cn.net.au/patfaq.txt

This FAQ is just a small part of a much larger effort to help you with
information research. The Spire Project is available as 3 website,
mirrors, zip-file, and 3 other faqs. I have included here a text version
ofour patent research (http://cn.net.au/patents.htm).

Enjoy,
David Novak - XXXX@XXXXX.COM
The Spire Project : SpireProject.com, SpireProject.co.uk, Cn.net.au

Patent Research


A patent discloses certain facts about a commercially important
invention in exchange for certain rights to exploit the invention. This
is a little simplistic, but explains why patents are factual, unique
from other research resources, and a little vague in certain specifics.
(See a sample a sample US patent[1], Australian patent[2], and this
brief description[3].)

This article first addresses the most useful free databases, then
describes national patent agency resources, commercial patent databases,
then other commercial services. At the end of this article, we describe
patent classification and patent search strategy.

[1]

Internet



Free Patent Databases

These databases are freely available online:

[4] The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO[89]) provides a US Patent
Bibliographic database at patents.uspto.gov[4] with full use of fields,
date and abstract text searching. Choose between their boolean
search[5], advanced (field) search[6] or by US patent number[7]. They
also maintain a fulltext [US] Aids Patent Database and other resources.

[43] The IBM's Patent Server is a public service providing a different
patent database[43] of US Patent abstracts. The IBM service is similar
but different from the USPTO service - certainly not less powerful.

[8] The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO[9]) maintains the
Canadian Patent Bibliographic Database[8] which extends from '89 to the
present. Abstracts are not provided. Descriptive info is here[8].

[9] The Japanese Patent Office (www.jpo-miti.go.jp[9]) has a searchable
database of Japanese patent abstracts[10], which includes the patent
number, title, inventor, company, and abstract of the patent.



There are more free patent databases - but each is limited and not as
research-worthy. Consider also the Internet Patent Search System[11].
Gregory Aharonian (remember XXXX@XXXXX.COM ?) currently delivers
US Patent titles retrieved by class/subclass. He also delivers Patent
abstract retrieval using patent numbers (but currently from 1981 to
1989). As you now know, patent.uspto.gov also delivers abstract
retrieval, but I like the more minimal title lists here.

Library


Patent libraries are an important and cost-effective patent resource.


Australia

IP Australia (www.ip