Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by kiranreddy » Thu, 06 Jan 2005 22:14:42


Hi,

Given the same IOS version,
Is there any difference between the Config file of a Cisco Router
and a Cisco Switch?
If not from Config file, How do I know the difference between the
two?

Any Idea?

Thanks in advance.

Regards
Kiran
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by rave » Thu, 06 Jan 2005 22:23:39

Cisco Routers have a different product number and cisco Switches have a
different product number.
If you wanna check then you can go to the enable mode of the device and
type "show version", look at the information for product number and you
can tell whether it is a switch or a router by looking for that at
Cisco's site.
If you have physical access to the switch then you can look at it, a
switch will hhave many ports like a hub and a router will have
altogether a different chassis.

 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by kiranreddy » Thu, 06 Jan 2005 22:34:12

Thanks for the early reply.

But I need to check it programatically.
Is there any range that the Product Number of Router or Switch falls?

one more question:

Is there any difference between Config files of the Cisco Router and a
Cisco Switch given the same IOS version?

Regards
Kiran
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by rave » Thu, 06 Jan 2005 23:20:11

yeah there is a lot of difference between a switch and the router
config, though a layer 3 switch does not have much differene but a
layer 2 switch has lot of difference.
there is not a specific product range for switch but a lot of ranges.
you can check out for yourself at the following links:
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
for swicthes
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
for routers
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by Brian » Thu, 06 Jan 2005 23:34:01


Kiran,

Your stuck in the "old days", the true definition of a router or switch in
Cisco speak is no longer valid. These days with the Cisco line pretty much
everything is a "router" to some extent. They almost all operate at layer 3.
There are a couple of base entry level switches that are still a layer 2
entity but that's pretty much it. Take the 3550 series for example, while
they physically appear to be a switch, they are infact a 12, 24 or 48 port
ethernet router. Take their router line now...you are usually talking a
modular type chasis that typically terminates some type of wan line...but
then again there are switching modules for some of the platforms....and the
opposite, some of their switch lines have wan cards.....

With legacy devices it's simple to tell if it's a true switch or a
router...if its a 1900, 2900, 3500 series it's a true layer 2 switch with no
layer 3 abilities. If it's a 800, 1600, 1700, 2500, 2600...all the way thru
12000 series then it's considered a router.

Assuming the device is properly configured and running properly:

Easiest way to tell if a "switch" is actually routing is to issue a "show ip
route" command. If the routing table is empty then it is most likely acting
as a switch.

Another way to tell is to look at the config, look for either ip
default-gateway x.x.x.x which tells you it's doing layer 2 (switching) or ip
route x.x.x.x x.x.x.x x.x.x.x which tells you that it's doing layer 3
(routing).

Yet another way is to look at the config and review the vlan
interfaces....are there IP addresses assigned to more than one of
them?..then it's most likely routing. Only one vlan IP'd...it's most acting
as a switch.

There really is no straight forward answer to your question...if it's a
newer device then it depends on how it's configured...if it's a legacy
device it's dependant on the platform..

IOS is irrelevant as each platform, whether a router or "switch" uses it's
own train, you will never have 2 dissimlar devices using the same IOS
train...version, possible, but not likely.

Only way to know for sure if it has layer 3 capabilities is to know the
full product line, which comes with experience.

-Brian
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by Wil Schult » Fri, 07 Jan 2005 00:22:15


> Is there any difference between the Config file of a Cisco Router
> and a Cisco Switch?

Well, for one... A switch will have a whole lot of ethernet ports.
Typically a router will have some WAN ports as well, ATM, Serial or
Controller ports.

If you look at the config file and see FastEthernet0/1 -->
FastEthernet0/48, it's a good chance you are looking at a switch. ;)


Wil
my 3?
"When everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked
something."
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by roberso » Fri, 07 Jan 2005 04:30:36

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



:> Given the same IOS version,
:> Is there any difference between the Config file of a Cisco Router
:> and a Cisco Switch?
:> If not from Config file, How do I know the difference between the
:> two?

:Your stuck in the "old days", the true definition of a router or switch in
:Cisco speak is no longer valid. These days with the Cisco line pretty much
:everything is a "router" to some extent. They almost all operate at layer 3.

:Only way to know for sure if it has layer 3 capabilities is to know the
:full product line, which comes with experience.

There's also the sysServices OID. It isn't authoratative in that it
talks about "primarily" rather than about "able to".

http://www.yqcomputer.com/ %40posting.google.com
--
Positrons can be described as electrons traveling backwards in time.
Certainly many Usenet arguments about the past become clearer when they
are re-interpreted as uncertainty about the future.
-- Walter Roberson
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by Brian » Fri, 07 Jan 2005 06:36:58


Excellent point as usual Walter!
 
 
 

Difference b/n a Cisco Router and Cisco Switch

Post by Bob the Bu » Sat, 08 Jan 2005 03:14:03

Router is a networking device that can determine the best path for IP
packets. A switch is something on the wall that you use to turn the lights
on or a button that boils the water on a kettle.
Good luck in your endeavours,
Roberto