Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Post by Nicholas K » Tue, 28 Oct 2008 07:27:25


I am wondering if there are any applications for higher-order Lagrange
approximating polynomials in digital signal processing or image
re-sampling. I know that Lagrange multipliers are used to some extent
in the construction of FIR filters, and are also used in bicubic
interpolation. However, is there an application involving higher order
Lagrange polynomials?

Does anyone know of a good reference book dealing with bicubic and/or
higher order Lagrange? Does using higher order improve the accuracy
with 2D, or do I still have to deal with the Runge phenomenon?

Nicholas
 
 
 

Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Post by STRAYD » Wed, 29 Oct 2008 15:53:21


hi nicholas,
in two dimensional channel estimation
methods..higher order interpolation techniques are used.please look
out for them. Long back i saw one pdf of some company on
internet..about 2d channel estimation.

thanks
particlereddy

 
 
 

Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Post by Nicholas K » Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:34:06

Thanks, particlereddy! I'll do a search for these techniques on Google.
This sounds very interesting. Thank you for drawing my attention to this!

Nicholas
 
 
 

Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Post by Martin Eis » Thu, 30 Oct 2008 21:21:01

Nicholas, note that "Lagrange multiplier" is a term from numerical
optimization with a meaning totally unrelated to Lagrange
polynomials.


Martin

--
Quidquid latine scriptum est, altum videtur.
 
 
 

Lagrange multipliers and other higher-order interpolation methods

Post by Nicholas K » Sun, 02 Nov 2008 00:15:28

Of course, there are different meanings ascribed to a series of methods
which are all named "Lagrange." The name is ubiquitous in science and
engineering.

Your comment is most appropriate for this discussion thread on comp.dsp.
Thanks Martin!

Nicholas