Coordinate of a point given point of origin, distance and bearing

Coordinate of a point given point of origin, distance and bearing

Post by wefwe » Wed, 19 Nov 2003 06:27:09


Hello,




I currently developping a aviation base map for my GPS.

To do this, I need to calculate the coordinate of a point given a point of
origin on the earth a bearing and a distance.

I don't really want to know how to do it; I just want to calculate it. So a
library (preferably in perl) would be great.

Do you know where I can find this? All my searches on google were
unsuccessful.

If you know any other place where I could ask this question, I would be
glad.



Thanks,

Regis
 
 
 

Coordinate of a point given point of origin, distance and bearing

Post by cjmc » Thu, 20 Nov 2003 02:36:45


Go to the National Geodetic Survey's web site at www.ngs.noaa.gov and
use the "geodesic direct" computation. That will get you answers
without all the details. There are dozens of publications available
there for downloading that can also drown you in the details ...

Cliff Mugnier
LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY

 
 
 

Coordinate of a point given point of origin, distance and bearing

Post by Ron McConn » Thu, 20 Nov 2003 15:19:58


Hi, Regis,

As Cliff says, check out

www.ngs.noaa.gov

Under the NGS Geodetic Tool Kit button find
"Inverse/Forward/Invers3D/Forwrd3D"

You will find the Fortran (IV?} source of the Vincenty
Forward (a.k.a. Direct) algorithm to
obtain lat2/long2
given lat1/long1, distance and bearing.
The "3D" versions also account for altitudes
above/below the reference surface.

The Forward algorithm is also built into
my freeware GCGC program along with the more common
Inverse algorithm (lat1/long1, lat2/long2
to obtain distance bearings 1-2 and 2-1).
It will accept decimal degree n/s/w/e input.
The executable and [Fortran 77] source code
are found at my website below.
Converting forward/direct to perl should
be straightforward. If you do, could you pass
along the perl version?

The best online tutorial on distance and bearing calculations,
with worked examples, is Ed Williams's Aviation Formulary.

http://www.yqcomputer.com/

Have fun.

Cheers,

Ron McConnell

XXXX@XXXXX.COM

N 40?46' 57.9" W 74?41' 21.9"
FN20ps77GU46 [FN20ps77GV75]

http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ~rcmcc