What is the potency of the IDLE command ? (was: IMAP Chat, IMAP IRC and so...)

What is the potency of the IDLE command ? (was: IMAP Chat, IMAP IRC and so...)

Post by kael » Mon, 12 Jul 2004 22:13:21


"wkearney99" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > a rit dans le message de



You're right. I don't realize how much bandwith it would need, more over
for shared folders.
I have already asked if it the could possible for 500 000 users to look
at the same public folder at the same time in


I would like a "permanent idling folder" (I don't know if can say that
expression) with mails into a specific format dedicated to shared
folders.

The IDLE command seems to allow that kind of permanent refresh : I was
with a friend on the phone and we where posting some mails into the
shared folder at the same time. And when I was changing a flag or
deleting a message e.g. I could hear his "oh !" exactly at the same the
time the message was changing of state !!!

"I like it, liiiiiiiiiike that" ;o)


Is there a RFC 2177 specialist around there who could explain us what is
the potency, actual or future, of the IDLE command ? It could be greatly
helpfull.

I imagine:
- an email that would allow to write into it without need to open it as
it was a draft mail;
- this email viewed at the same time by 2 people located into opposed
placed could be dynamical thanks to a special intervention of the
server. The IMAP server could support a special application for that
specific folder. Unless a special mail format would be enough with the
IDLE command ?


Let's say "imap.free.fr" is accessible from the outside world.


I got to learn on it.

kael | *Les pieds sur Terre et la te dans les oiles*
 
 
 

What is the potency of the IDLE command ? (was: IMAP Chat, IMAP IRC and so...)

Post by wkearney9 » Tue, 13 Jul 2004 00:44:15

> You're right. I don't realize how much bandwith it would need, more over

It's the classic scalabilty problem. Sure you "can" do it but not without
costs. The costs keep shifting as both server and bandwidth performance
improves. It does still beg the question of whether or not it's a "good idea"
even with unlimited resources. There are always other solutions to consider.


Sure but up to what limit? While it frees the client from polling it just
shifts that burden onto the server. If it's an infrequently updated folder it
does save bandwidth. But if it's a frequently updated folder then it's
potentially worse. TANSTAAFL.

-Bill Kearney