A bit of computer history

A bit of computer history

Post by leedm77 » Sat, 24 Feb 2007 07:12:39


There's a story out there, and I cannot remember as many details as I
would like. Maybe someone can point me to it.

Back when Apple announced the Intel based Mac's, there were several
reports that Apple's sales would be hurt because they announced too
early. Some cited the example of another company that announced next
generation hardware months before it was available, and subsequently
went out of business because sales dropped.

Turns out this wasn't what caused the anonymous computer company to go
out of business. They had stopped production on the old systems, but
a senior-enough-to-do-damage official in the company found a batch of
PC boards for the soon-to-be-obsolete machines. He proceeded to spend
a good chunk of capital on building those into computers that would
never be sold.

Anyone know the name of the company?

Thanks!
dave
<><
 
 
 

A bit of computer history

Post by Quas.co.u » Tue, 27 Feb 2007 08:32:11


Well what company do you mean, wasn't that NeXT with their NextStep for
Intel?
(There are few more examples.)
It is also known history when some company begun to produce cure which
allowed
even finished men who spent their resource to be soldering.
Some other companies begun to produce analogical products some with
CIA_* in naming.
(You may found out more about from spam you may receive.)
After that some chief of the company speaking to the investors expressed
interesting example of English literature of certain style.

Well recently I want to implement the technology which may make almost
any available
hardware to be compliant with any software designed for any other
available hardware,
but if only some quality features (as size of memory performance of the
processor) allows it.

For Example this technology with respective settings would
allow to run RISC OS on Motorola 680*0,
and do it with little lose of performance.

This technology will be segregated per few levels lowest I plan to make
available under some liberal license.
Some other parts I plan to distribute not on liberal license or licenses.

--Michael

 
 
 

A bit of computer history

Post by leedm77 » Wed, 28 Feb 2007 00:43:14


I found my answer: it's the Osborne Effect!
http://www.yqcomputer.com/

dave
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A bit of computer history

Post by Quas.co.u » Sat, 03 Mar 2007 04:05:32


You gave not clear information:

1. PC traditionally called x86 or even at least 386 systems, both
Osborne was 8080 compliant.
2. Osborne-1 and Osborne-2 where the same architecture machines, with OS
which abstracted
hardware architecture from software. And their OS did it better than
Linux I have on my machine.
3. Osborne effect made problems for Osborne but not suppliers, because
Osborne did not supply
components, but the entire computers made of unique components.

I hope you did not encripted an information you gave in your message.

Perhaps mr. Osborne could use better market strategy, which sometimes
may require some
review of previously designed principles.
I remember machines in same class with Osborne not so far ago were sold
even in here where do I live.
It was market for them after Osborne itself left the market.

--Quas.co.ua