Fast laptop IDE drives?

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by wm_wals » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 02:08:35


Hi!


Believe it or not, 7200 RPM laptop drives exist.


There is a Hitachi Travelstar drive that I've found to be a pretty
good performer. It is a 5400 RPM drive. I think the model # is 5K160.
You can get it in capacities from 60~160GB in serial or parallel ATA
versions. I have a 60GB model in an Other World Computing USB/Firewire
self powered external box.

The Western Digital Scorpio 2.5" drives also seem to be quite nice. I
have a 120GB one that I put into the 2nd hard drive tray for my
Latitude D800. It is quiet and fast. I use it for backups.

William
 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Uli Lin » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 02:40:53

Louis Ohland schrieb:

Have you checked if BIOS is capable handling drives greater than 30 GByte?

My ThinkPad 390E isn't capable, my 770Z is.
In doubt, you'll want a drive that can be clipped down by a jumper

--
Uli

 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Louis Ohla » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 03:08:00


What is the fastest RPM for laptop IDE? 5400?

Which drive?
 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Louis Ohla » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 03:34:36

The 8364 does Ultra/33. If we can findt those 4 pin cables, I'd like to
stuff a pocket rocket into my 8364, format it with the board IDE
controller, then re-install W98SE. The MD is a 3,600 RPM drive, though
it's much smaller, therefore the head moves less. Still, I think a
laptop drive has much better throughput.

Now how to make it bootable...
 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Dan » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 04:24:41


How about a nice Intellistation, instead? 15,000 RPM Ultra320 SCSI?
 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Kevin Bowl » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 07:03:15


I have a 7K100 in my T42. No other way to go. Hitachi will probably
refresh the line soon, so you can either get one cheap or a new one with
higher capacity.
 
 
 

Fast laptop IDE drives?

Post by Kevin Bowl » Mon, 02 Apr 2007 07:10:02


Nothing like the whine of a 15k in the morning :-).

Modern SATA drives will give anything but the latest SAS drives a run
for the money. The faster RPM drives will always have better seek, but
the density of Seagate's 7200.10 line make them a clear throughput
winner. If you need large, reliable storage and want to save some money
check them out.