Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Post by Thomas Lev » Thu, 12 Jul 2007 11:47:54


Yesterday, I saw a sign where the registered trademark symbol was
placed directly above a comma rather than beside it. I thought it
looked better there. This got me thinking about placement of
superscripts, mainly for footnotes; I think superscripts, at least
those for footnotes, may look better if placed directly above the
punctuation. Has anyone ever considered this before? I haven't tried
it in *** yet, but I did try it with plain text:

The first group is the conventional way, and the second group is the
unconventional way with the superscript above the punctuation. Within
each group, the first example is supposed to be a footnote after the
letter "I" and the second example is supposed to be 1^2.

I 2
I
I .

1 2
1
1 .

--------------

I 2
I
I .


1 2
1
1 .
 
 
 

Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Post by Werner Gru » Thu, 12 Jul 2007 12:22:39


Try the following:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

This is a test\footnote{This is a test.}. % old style

This is a test.\footnote{This is a test.} % old style

This is a test\makebox[0pt][l]{\footnotemark}. \footnotetext{This is a
test.}

\end{document}

Werner

 
 
 

Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Post by Scott Paki » Thu, 12 Jul 2007 12:30:22


Maybe do something like this?

\newcommand{\pfootnote}{\,\llap\footnotemark\footnotetext}

-- Scott
 
 
 

Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Post by Thomas Lev » Sat, 14 Jul 2007 10:05:22

I was sure it was possible using LaTeX; I was just too lazy to figure
it out. I was really asking why nobody does it.
 
 
 

Putting Superscripts ABOVE Punctuation rather than BESIDE the Punctuation

Post by anon » Sat, 14 Jul 2007 13:05:39


One reason is that there's a convention inherited from the days of old
when you couldn't put anything above punctuation without cutting both
pieces of type in two, and fitting the parts together.

But it would be best to check the development of manuscript and
epigraphic conventions as well, in case there's a further story to be
told there. I'm not sure when superscripts started to be used for
raising to powers but I have a feeling that it wasn't until well into
the seven *** th century.

For abbreviations, though, it goes back much further. There are
abbreviations that do exactly this in manuscripts and in epigraphs, if
not also in print. Given that Gutenberg was attempting to mass-produce
manuscript, maybe his Bible would be a good place to look for examples.
Then you could check the next few generations of printers to see what
features they progressively remove.