Java I/O Project

Java I/O Project

Post by Chase Preu » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 10:03:44


I am board and want to do something with Java I/O (networking
included). Any Ideas???
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Jeff Higgi » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 11:24:07


Sure.
Work harder on your English spelling and grammar.

Roedy Green's Canadian Mind Products site has many
suggestions for Java projects,

< http://www.yqcomputer.com/ ;

unfortunatly getting a 404 error at the moment.

 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Roedy Gree » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 13:02:07

On Sat, 5 Apr 2008 18:03:44 -0700 (PDT), Chase Preuninger
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
who said :

see http://www.yqcomputer.com/

I think you mean "bored".
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Chase Preu » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 21:04:16

Spelling and grammar have never been my strong point.
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Roedy Gree » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 23:19:43

On Sat, 5 Apr 2008 22:24:07 -0400, "Jeff Higgins"
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
said :


that should read http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Roedy Gree » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 23:32:17

On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 05:04:16 -0700 (PDT), Chase Preuninger
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
who said :


Programmers tend to be proud of poor spelling and grammar. They think
of those skills as feminine or frivolous. However, they are necessary
skills for programmers because:

1. computer languages require perfect, or at least consistent
spelling.

2. on a team, you will drive people nuts if you don't use properly
spelled variable names because they won't be able to type them
correctly.

3. computer languages require perfect grammar.

4. Computer programs tend to do subtle things. You need to be able to
explain to other programmers what they are in the comments.. You can't
get away with shorthand that only you can understand.

5. If you are asking for help, and you make a large number of errors
in your grammar or spelling, it may be taken as disrespectful.
Further, you will may be perceived as too stupid to bother with.
I get emails from soldiers with hundreds of spelling and grammatical
errors. I can't help but feel contempt for these people even before
they start attempting to justify why they kill children.
see http://www.yqcomputer.com/

6. One way of looking at it is not that your spelling and grammar
skills are non-existent, but that you speak a private dialect that
nobody else understands. You are quite likely perfectly accurate in
applying its unwritten rules of spelling and grammar. I recall my 3
younger sisters devised a private language they used prior to entering
school. I was worried no one would understand them at all when they
reached school age. Even I understood only a part of it. However, it
took only a month or two once they entered school to learn standard
English.


--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Lew » Mon, 07 Apr 2008 23:45:43

Chase Preuninger said :



and several more good points. On top of all those, being careless about
spelling builds bad habits in a profession that demands spelling perfection
(or at least consistency). Justifying that carelessness (especially with a
justification as weak as, "I make errors because I'm not good at not making
errors") is another bad habit. Working on spelling, at least when discussing
programming matters, and acknowledging one's errors without attempting to
justify them are good disciplines for the mind.

--
Lew
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Roedy Gree » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 00:08:31

On Sun, 06 Apr 2008 10:45:43 -0400, Lew < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote,
quoted or indirectly quoted someone who said :


Any decent newsreader will have a spell checker. see
http://www.yqcomputer.com/

You then have no excuse for a post containing non-existent words.
Granted, it is still possible to write "your" for "you're", or "that"
for "than".

When you don't use the spell checker you are broadcasting the hidden
message "My time is infinitely valuable. Yours is worthless." This is
hardly the best attitude to use for begging free help.

see http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Roedy Gree » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 00:44:51

On Sun, 6 Apr 2008 05:04:16 -0700 (PDT), Chase Preuninger
< XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone
who said :


see http://www.yqcomputer.com/
--

Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
The Java Glossary
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by David Sega » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 01:42:32


Agreed but refactoring solves this problem.
They do, and they tell you immediately if it is incorrect.
True, but his posts were easily understood.
This is because spelling, grammar and your speaking voice are all used
to reinforce a social class structure. It is assumed that someone with
an Irish or North American accent is inferior to someone with an
Oxford accent. Poor grammar or spelling is another sign that a person
was brought up in an inferior social class.

Your web site indicates that you are a compassionate person. By all
means judge your emails on their content but try to resist judging
them by their social class and that means ignoring grammatical and
spelling errors.
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Lew » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 02:09:04


I agree that that is legitimate for general social situations, but in a
newsgroup that promotes professionalism and enhanced competency in computer
programming it's useful to suggest increased discipline in these areas. Some
attention to grammar and spelling is necessary just to be professional; simply
saying, "I'm bad at that" and insisting on some sort of demagogic "let's all
just be social equals" fooferol doesn't engender any kind of professional
growth. Rigor is an essential part of the programming profession, so please
do not justify intellectual laziness.

--
Lew
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Martin Gre » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 04:30:26


I've seen comments in several places and at several times that a *good*
programmer also tends to be particular about spelling and grammar as well
as meticulous in their use of language. I've read enough well-crafted code
and accurate, well written system specifications to believe this to be
true.


--
martin@ | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. |
org | Zappa fan & glider pilot
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Arne Vaj » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 05:06:08


Could you demonstrate your spelling and grammar skills by
writing the above in correct danish ?

Arne
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Martin Gre » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 05:14:45


Not a chance! I can't even order a beer in Danish despite spending a week
in Hilleroed with visits to Ringsted and Copenhavn. That was a VERY
long time ago but good memories linger on.


--
martin@ | Martin Gregorie
gregorie. |
org | Zappa fan & glider pilot
 
 
 

Java I/O Project

Post by Arne Vaj » Tue, 08 Apr 2008 05:29:31


"En , tak"

should do that.

:-)

(now you just need to figure out how to pronounce that ...)

My point was that English is not the native language for everyone
and you should not expect perfect spelling and grammar from everyone.

Arne