Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Mark » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 12:36:22


Hi all
Due to some *** people at work we need to build into the login script
a popup policy message message with a yes and no option.
Yes means you agree and then process the rest of the login script.
No will log you out.
To save me the pain of working this out (I'm not the best script writer)
has anyone done this and is willing to share the code or could you pouint
me to some web based examples I could modify for my purposes.

Thanks
Regards
Mark
 
 
 

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Roland Hal » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 18:10:02


: Due to some *** people at work we need to build into the login script
: a popup policy message message with a yes and no option.
: Yes means you agree and then process the rest of the login script.
: No will log you out.
: To save me the pain of working this out (I'm not the best script writer)
: has anyone done this and is willing to share the code or could you pouint
: me to some web based examples I could modify for my purposes.

Mark...

Did you know you can make two registry entry changes so that the
notifications come up, even before they logon to the network? This should
be just one requirement of your user's to comply with as part of your
policies and procedures.

http://www.yqcomputer.com/

HTH...

--
Roland Hall
/* This information is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability
or fitness for a particular purpose. */
Technet Script Center - http://www.yqcomputer.com/
WSH 5.6 Documentation - http://www.yqcomputer.com/
MSDN Library - http://www.yqcomputer.com/

 
 
 

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Mark » Wed, 18 Feb 2004 11:59:09

Roland
Whilst very helpful and you have just added another string to my bow I would
like the users to have a yes/no
button option so that if they agree they get in and if they select no they
get logged out.
Regards
Mark







script
pouint
http://www.yqcomputer.com/
 
 
 

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Al Dunbar » Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:57:38

"Mark" < XXXX@XXXXX.COM > wrote in message
news:0rfYb.107$ XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
would

I think the phrase is "arrow to my quiver" rather than "string to my bow",
but I digress.

IMHO, if you have naughty people, you should consider having them sign a
formal agreement that they understand and acknowledge the various written
conditions of use policies. If someone does get logged in, then breaks the
rules and you take him to court, how could you prove that "he must have
clicked on 'I agree', or he would not have gotten in". Even with a
demonstration (questionable as that might be) a clever defence attorney will
ask you to prove that the mechanism was in place on the day in question, and
that it was completely foolproof.

A related issue could be that those that want to abuse the company's
technology are not likely the ones that take that technology seriously.

Aside from that, it has been my experience that, whatever extra clicks or
keystrokes needed to get into the system or an application becomes as
automatic as hitting the enter key. Have you ever installed software and
clicked the "I agree" button without actually reading the entire EULA?

But if you want to do it:

select case msgbox("EULA statement", vbYesNo or vbExclamation, "User
Agreement" )
case vbno
call refuse()
end select

' continue on with logon script

The refuse function would either do a logout, shutdown, or restart of some
sort.

If you were running logon scripts synchronously, I am not sure if the user
could get to the task manager to simple terminate the script.


/Al

writer)
should
but
merchantability


 
 
 

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Roland Hal » Thu, 19 Feb 2004 08:04:12

Al Dunbar [MS-MVP]" wrote:
: "Mark" wrote:
: > Roland
: > Whilst very helpful and you have just added another string to my bow I
: would
: > like the users to have a yes/no
: > button option so that if they agree they get in and if they select no
they
: > get logged out.
:
: I think the phrase is "arrow to my quiver" rather than "string to my bow",
: but I digress.
:
: IMHO, if you have naughty people, you should consider having them sign a
: formal agreement that they understand and acknowledge the various written
: conditions of use policies. If someone does get logged in, then breaks
the
: rules and you take him to court, how could you prove that "he must have
: clicked on 'I agree', or he would not have gotten in". Even with a
: demonstration (questionable as that might be) a clever defence attorney
will
: ask you to prove that the mechanism was in place on the day in question,
and
: that it was completely foolproof.
:
: A related issue could be that those that want to abuse the company's
: technology are not likely the ones that take that technology seriously.
:
: Aside from that, it has been my experience that, whatever extra clicks or
: keystrokes needed to get into the system or an application becomes as
: automatic as hitting the enter key. Have you ever installed software and
: clicked the "I agree" button without actually reading the entire EULA?
:
: But if you want to do it:
:
: select case msgbox("EULA statement", vbYesNo or vbExclamation, "User
: Agreement" )
: case vbno
: call refuse()
: end select
:
: ' continue on with logon script
:
: The refuse function would either do a logout, shutdown, or restart of some
: sort.
:
: If you were running logon scripts synchronously, I am not sure if the user
: could get to the task manager to simple terminate the script.

I agree with Al here, hence I stated 'one of...'. However, you also need it
on the computer, because hacker's have not signed your P&P agreement. It
also reinforces the rules in case of visitors. HR generally doesn't get
involved when a contractor comes in for an hour, day, etc., although forms
should be made available. Your P&P should always document when any all
modifications are made. These addendums should be sent out to everyone,
requiring a signature and data signed and added to their personnel file.

If you require acceptance prior to logging onto the workstation, their only
alternative is to not log on if they do not accept.
This line will keep you out of trouble: "By continuing to logon and use this
computer, you accept this agreement in full and agree to be bound by its
provisions."

The law doesn't say they have to read it. It only says that it has to be
made available. If your logon script doesn't run for any reason, then it
wasn't made available. And, if your P&P procedure is not 100%, and you have
a high turnover rate, like we did (Offshore Drilling), people will come on
board sometimes who have not completed all of their HR documents. The
larger the organization, the more latency involved.

--
Roland Hall
/* This information is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability
or fitness for a particular purpose. */
Technet Script Center - http://www.microsoft.com/technet/scriptcenter/
WSH 5.6 Documentation - http://msdn.microsoft.com/downloads/list/we
 
 
 

Help for Scripting policy agrement into login script.

Post by Mark » Thu, 19 Feb 2004 09:10:11

hank you Roland and Al

bow",
You know I'd always heard the phrase as "String to my bow" but always
thought that
"arrow to my quiver" made more sense although I've never heard anyone use
it.
Anyway
The info you have provided is of much help.
The Human Resources and legal issue you have raised I will pass on to the HR
dept. as
I don't have to think about those issues. I just have to "make it so".
I enjoy the task though as it's something different from the ordinary for
me.
Regards
Mark



"Roland Hall" <nobody@nowhere> wrote in message
news:% XXXX@XXXXX.COM ...
bow",
written
or
some
user
it
only
this
have
http://msdn.microsoft.com/downloads/list/webdev.asp