Newbie DNS Setup Question

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by bilbobaggi » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 09:45:08


I have recently added another domain (e.g. MyNewDomain.com) to my Win2K
advanced server.

People from external sites can see the MyNewDomain.com domain fine.

When people on the LAN try to browse to MyNewDomain.com, they can't
find it - the only way they can browse to it is to use the IP Address.

I've added the MyDomain.com to my forward lookup zones in the DNS
section of the server.

I think that to solve this problem I need to add MyDomain.com to the
REVERSE lookup zones in the DNS as well, but I don't know how to do it.


Would someone please give me an example of what I'm supposed to do to
add a new domain to my server?

Thanks in advance.
 
 
 

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by Barry Marg » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 11:19:37

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



No, that shouldn't be necessary.

Are you doing NAT on your router? If so, the users behind the router
probably need to use the private address to get to your web server, but
your DNS is presumably giving out the private address so that Internet
users can get to it. To resolve this, you need to use split-brain DNS:
one server for internal users, another for external users. Or you could
use BIND, whose "views" feature allows you to have different versions of
a zone depending on the address of the client.

--
Barry Margolin, XXXX@XXXXX.COM
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***

 
 
 

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by bilbobaggi » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 11:59:45

Barry

Thank you for the reply.

I think the router (Netgear DG834) is doing NAT. I just redirects
various external requests to different machines on the LAN.

Split-brain DNS is not an option since I only have one server.

I didn't know about BIND. Is that available on Windows 2000 Servers?

Someone suggested just editing the hosts file on the server, but I
can't see how that would benefit any other users on the LAN.
 
 
 

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by Brant I. S » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:02:54

BIND is available for the Windows platform, but I do not know what effect
running it on a Win2000 Server will have, as AD makes use of some
MS-specific zones; something like _msds.yourdomain.com (it escapes me at the
moment). I know later versions of BIND support these non-RFC compliant
zones, but it may be a problem.

But Barry is right, reverse DNS is not the issue... You are not handing out
the right address for the internal client. Your other option, since
split-zone DNS is not an option, is to do away with DNS and use the hosts
file.


On 01/26/2005 09:59 PM, in article
XXXX@XXXXX.COM ,
 
 
 

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by Barry Marg » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:11:54

In article < XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



Yes, there's a Windows port of BIND. BIND is configured by editing text
files, but there may be some third-party GUI interfaces.

--
Barry Margolin, XXXX@XXXXX.COM
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
 
 
 

Newbie DNS Setup Question

Post by Barry Marg » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:36:22

In article <BE1DC58F.44828% XXXX@XXXXX.COM >,



There's nothing non-compliant about those records. If it's the
underscore you're worried about, it's only invalid in hostnames, i.e. A
records. I believe MS uses it only for other types of records.

--
Barry Margolin, XXXX@XXXXX.COM
Arlington, MA
*** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***